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Author Topic: Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids  (Read 6215 times)

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Offline BristolUK

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Re: Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2009, 10:10:54 PM »
Traditional values.........
Point those parts out please lol
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Offline Paladin (Site Admin)

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Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2009, 11:47:29 PM »


'Sexting' very popular among youth


Friday December 4th, 2009

Poll finds sharing nude photos, videos common among young Americans


http://timestranscript.canadaeast.com/newstoday/article/878724


WASHINGTON - A new poll shows that more than a quarter of young people in the U.S. are "sexting" -- sharing nude photos, videos and chat by cellphone or online.

The practice is fairly commonplace among young people, despite sometimes grim consequences for those who do it, an Associated Press-MTV poll found.

That includes Sammy, a 16-year-old from Northern California who asked that his last name not be used.

Sammy said he had shared naked pictures of himself with girlfriends. He also shared naked pictures of someone else that a friend had sent him.

What he didn't realize at the time was that young people across the country -- in Florida, Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania -- have faced charges, in some cases felony charges, for sending nude pictures.

"That's why I probably wouldn't do it again," Sammy said.

Yet, "I just don't see it as that big of a problem, personally."

That was the view of nearly half of those surveyed who have been involved in sexting. The other half said it's a serious problem -- and did it anyway. Knowing there might be consequences hasn't stopped them.

"There's definitely the invincibility factor that young people feel," said Kathleen Bogle, a sociology professor at La Salle University in Philadelphia and author of the book "Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus."

"That's part of the reason why they have a high rate of car accidents and things like that, is they think, 'Oh, well, that will never happen to me,'" Bogle said.

Research shows teenage brains are not quite mature enough to make good decisions consistently. By the mid-teens, the brain's reward centres, the parts involved in emotional arousal, are well-developed, making teens more vulnerable to peer pressure.

But it is not till the early 20s that the brain's frontal cortex, where reasoning connects with emotion, enabling people to weigh consequences, has finished forming.

Beyond feeling invincible, young people also have a much different view of sexual photos that might be posted online, Bogle said. They don't think about the idea that those photos might wind up in the hands of potential employers or college admissions officers, she said.

"Sometimes they think of it as a joke; they have a laugh about it," Bogle said. "In some cases, it's seen as flirtation. They're thinking of it as something far less serious and aren't thinking of it as consequences down the road or who can get hold of this information. They're also not thinking about worst-case scenarios that parents might worry about."

Sexting doesn't stop with teenagers. Young adults are even more likely to have sexted; one-third of them said they had been involved in sexting, compared with about one-quarter of teenagers.

Thelma, a 25-year-old from Natchitoches, Louisiana, who didn't want her last name used, said she's been asked more than once to send naked pictures of herself to a man.

"It's just when you're talking to a guy who's interested in you, and you might have a sexual relationship, so they just want to see you naked," she said, adding that she never complied with those requests.

"But with my current boyfriend, I did it on my own; he didn't ask me," she said, adding that she was confident he would keep the image to himself.

Those who sent nude pictures of themselves mostly said they went to a boyfriend, girlfriend or romantic interest.

But 14 per cent said they suspect the pictures were shared without permission, and they may be right: Seventeen per cent of those who received naked pictures said they passed them along to someone else, often to more than just one person.

Boys were a little more likely than girls to say they received naked pictures or video of someone that had been passed around without the person's consent. Common reasons were that they thought other people would want to see, that they were showing off and that they were bored.

Girls were a little more likely to send pictures of themselves. Yet boys were more likely to say that sexting is "hot," while most girls called it "slutty."

Altogether, 10 per cent said they had sent naked pictures of themselves on their cellphone or online.

Criminal charges aren't the worst consequences. In at least two cases, sexting has been linked to suicide. Last year in Cincinnati, 18-year-old Jessica Logan hanged herself after weeks of ridicule at school; she had sent a nude cellphone picture to her boyfriend, and after they broke up, he forwarded the picture to other girls.

And three months ago, 13-year-old Hope Witsell hanged herself, after relentless taunting at her school near Tampa, Florida. She had sent a nude photo of herself to a boy she liked, and another girl used his phone to send the picture to other students who forwarded it along. The St. Petersburg Times first reported on Hope's death this week.

Other teenage suicides have been linked to online bullying, also a subject of the AP-MTV poll. Half of all young people said they have been targets of digital bullying.

That can mean someone wrote something about them on the Internet that was mean or a lie, or someone shared an email or instant message that was supposed to be private. Less often, it can be more serious, such as taking pictures or video of someone in a sexual situation and sharing it with others.


Offline Canadian Crime News

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Re: Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2011, 12:03:46 AM »


Think before you post




News ... you can use..

Offline lilbab24

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Re: Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2011, 06:20:33 PM »
I don't watch the new Degrassi shows, but the one I did catch was of a teenage girl who thought it'd be cool to text her boyfriend naked pics of herself.. at least, until he got pissed at her and texted the pics to the whole school.... a lot of them think it could never happen to them, but it can happen to anyone who puts themselves in that kind of situation.
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Offline Paladin (Site Admin)

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Re: Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2011, 06:48:23 PM »
The problem is that all these young girls think that "it's love" and that it will 'last forever'. Another reasoning is that it will only happen to some one else and 'not to me'.

Parents and schools need to come up with a way to disprove these myths.

Offline BristolUK

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Re: Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2011, 07:21:06 PM »
Parents and schools need to come up with a way to disprove these myths.

How about a montage of......

no, perhaps not.  :o
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Offline Jesso Yewno

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Parents urged to explain the risks and horrors of sexting to kids
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2014, 12:48:08 PM »
Pull the plug on naked Twitter teens

By Dr. Keith Ablow ,March 22, 2014 , FoxNews.com

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2014/03/22/pull-plug-on-naked-twitter-teens/?intcmp=features

High school students from across Nassau and Suffolk counties in New York have been posting explicit photos of themselves, sometimes naked, sometimes drunk and sometimes touching each other intimately on a Twitter feed called @LIPartyStories. One now-infamous girl appears in a photograph urinating in a sink while wearing a Happy Birthday tiara.

Welcome to young America.

It is no longer news that narcissism stoked by the Internet can dissolve anything left of the modesty of American teenagers, who already fancy themselves worthy of posting hundreds or thousands of photographs of themselves on Facebook and having their egos pumped up by equally deluded “followers” on Twitter.

It is no longer news that sex (and, to a lesser extent, showcasing bodily functions like urination) has become the ready antidote to feelings of depression and boredom.

What may be news, however, is that parents of such teenagers would need a reminder of how to respond when their sons and daughters circulate photographs of themselves drunk, passed out or in various stages of undress.

Here’s what the parents of all the young people who fed the@LIPartyStories inappropriate images of themselves should do:  Confiscate their phones, shut down their Twitter and Facebook accounts and test them randomly for drugs and alcohol every two or three weeks for the next year.  Each positive test should result in being grounded for a month.  And every one of the teenagers directly involved should be in psychotherapy.

School administrators should suspend each and every one of them from school for two weeks and admit them back to school only with a note from a psychologist or psychiatrist or licensed social worker stating that the student has begun treatment.

Click here for full article..

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2014/03/22/pull-plug-on-naked-twitter-teens/?intcmp=features


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